What Hiding Reveals: Ironic Effects of Withholding Information

Imagine being asked about your recreational drug habits by your employer, and that you’ve occasionally indulged. We show that people believe that the best way to deal with such situations is to opt out of answering at all – but that this strategy is costly, because observers infer the very worst.



Citation:

Leslie John and Michael Norton (2013) ,"What Hiding Reveals: Ironic Effects of Withholding Information", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 41, eds. Simona Botti and Aparna Labroo, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: .

Authors

Leslie John , Harvard Business School, USA
Michael Norton , Harvard Business School, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 41 | 2013



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