Time, Money, and Morality

Are there simple ways to encourage self-reflection to decrease immoral behavior? Four experiments examine the effect of shifting focus from money onto time. We found that priming time (vs. money) leads individuals to behave more ethically by cheating less, because thinking about time makes people reflect on who they are.



Citation:

Francesca Gino and Cassie Mogilner (2013) ,"Time, Money, and Morality", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 41, eds. Simona Botti and Aparna Labroo, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: .

Authors

Francesca Gino, Harvard University
Cassie Mogilner, The Wharton School, University of Pennsylvania, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 41 | 2013



Share Proceeding

Featured papers

See More

Featured

Unintended Customer Consequences of Corporate Lobbying

Gautham Vadakkepatt, George Mason University
Kelly Martin, Colorado State University
Neeru Paharia, Georgetown University, USA
Sandeep Arora, University of Manitoba, Canada

Read More

Featured

The Influence of Conflicting and Complementary Benefit Goals on the Execution of Accuracy and Effort Process Goals

Felipe Marinelli Affonso, University of Florida, USA
Chris Janiszewski, University of Florida, USA

Read More

Featured

Unobserved Altruism: How Social- And Self-Signaling Motivations Shape Willingness to Donate

Jennifer Savary, University of Arizona, USA
Kelly Goldsmith, Vanderbilt University, USA

Read More

Engage with Us

Becoming an Association for Consumer Research member is simple. Membership in ACR is relatively inexpensive, but brings significant benefits to its members.