Behind the "Privacy Paradox": Decreasing Disclosure By Viewing Information As a Constrained Resource

People paradoxically believe that privacy is important, yet regularly share their information in relatively unprotected forums. Four experiments examine how the lack of perceived constraints, relative to time or money, leads people to undervalue this resource and that priming resource constraints can lead to lower rates of personal disclosure.



Citation:

Ellie Kyung (2013) ,"Behind the "Privacy Paradox": Decreasing Disclosure By Viewing Information As a Constrained Resource", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 41, eds. Simona Botti and Aparna Labroo, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: .

Authors

Ellie Kyung, Dartmouth College, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 41 | 2013



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