Disproportionate Positivity and Negativity Biases of Brand Extension Information

Under high-accessibility scenarios, negativity extension biases on high-entitativity family brands were more salient. Under low-accessibility situations, the negativity biases of similar extension information on both high- and low-entitativity family brands were more salient, whereas the negativity biases of dissimilar extension information on high-entitativity family brands were more salient.



Citation:

Joseph W. Chang, Yung-Chien Lou, and You Lin (2013) ,"Disproportionate Positivity and Negativity Biases of Brand Extension Information", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 41, eds. Simona Botti and Aparna Labroo, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research.

Authors

Joseph W. Chang, Vancouver Island University, Canada
Yung-Chien Lou, National Chengchi Uniersity, Taiwan
You Lin, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Taiwan



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 41 | 2013



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