The Acuity of Vice: Goal Conflict Improves Visual Sensitivity to Portion Size Changes

We propose that ambivalent attitudes toward food (both desiring it and perceiving it as harmful) enhance visual sensitivity to changes in food portions. As a result, children and adults who feel ambivalence toward hedonic foods (e.g. restrained eaters) estimate increasing food portions more accurately.



Citation:

Yann Cornil, Nailya Ordabayeva, and Pierre Chandon (2013) ,"The Acuity of Vice: Goal Conflict Improves Visual Sensitivity to Portion Size Changes", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 41, eds. Simona Botti and Aparna Labroo, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: .

Authors

Yann Cornil, INSEAD, France
Nailya Ordabayeva, Erasmus University Rotterdam, The Netherlands
Pierre Chandon, INSEAD, France



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 41 | 2013



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