Going Green For Self Vs. Others: Gender and Identity Salience Effects on Green Consumption

This paper examines the effects of gender and identities on green consumption. Previous research shows that women are greener than men. However, we extend these findings by showing that social (vs. personal) identity changes the impact of gender on green consumption. This effect is mediated by self-transcendence values.



Citation:

Diego Costa Pinto, Marcia Herter, Patricia Rossi, and Adilson Borges (2013) ,"Going Green For Self Vs. Others: Gender and Identity Salience Effects on Green Consumption", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 41, eds. Simona Botti and Aparna Labroo, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research.

Authors

Diego Costa Pinto, Reims Management School, France
Marcia Herter, Reims Management School, France
Patricia Rossi, Reims Management School, France
Adilson Borges, Reims Management School, France



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 41 | 2013



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