The Power to Control Time: How Power Influences How Much Time (You Think) You Have

Powerful individuals believe they have control over outcomes that they could not possibly control, such as the outcome of a die roll. Across five studies, we found that this illusory control leads high-power individuals to perceive having more available time than low-power individuals. Implications of the power-time link are discussed.



Citation:

Alice Moon and Serena Chen (2013) ,"The Power to Control Time: How Power Influences How Much Time (You Think) You Have", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 41, eds. Simona Botti and Aparna Labroo, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: .

Authors

Alice Moon, University of California Berkeley, USA
Serena Chen, University of California Berkeley, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 41 | 2013



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