Does Bitter Taste Make You Perform Better in Self-Control?

In the present study, two experiments demonstrate that experiencing bitter taste may lead to better self-control performance; however, this effect exists only for participants with high BTP. For those with low BTP, bitterness experiences lead to decreased overall performance. Self-control goal mediates the relationship.



Citation:

Chun-Ming Yang and Xiaoyu Zhou (2013) ,"Does Bitter Taste Make You Perform Better in Self-Control?", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 41, eds. Simona Botti and Aparna Labroo, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research.

Authors

Chun-Ming Yang, Ming Chuan University, Taiwan
Xiaoyu Zhou, Peking University, China



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 41 | 2013



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