When Temptations Come Alive: How Anthropomorphization Undermines Consumer Self-Control

What happens when your temptations come alive? Anthropomorphizing tempting products hampers consumer self-control by decreasing identification of a self-control conflict. Four studies show that participants were less likely to identify conflicts and more likely to indulge in temptations when tempting products (high-caloric cookies or TV gadgets) were anthropomorphized.



Citation:

Julia Hur, Minjung Koo, and Wilhelm Hofmann (2013) ,"When Temptations Come Alive: How Anthropomorphization Undermines Consumer Self-Control", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 41, eds. Simona Botti and Aparna Labroo, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: .

Authors

Julia Hur, Northwestern University, USA
Minjung Koo, Sungkyunkwan University, Republic of Korea
Wilhelm Hofmann, University of Chicago, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 41 | 2013



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