People Pay More When They Pay-It-Forward

In six studies we compare behaviors under the Pay-it-Forward pricing to those under the Pay-What-You-Want pricing. Field experiments showed that people paid more under Pay-it-Forward pricing. Laboratory experiments tested social forces that explain this effect. People paid more when they signaled generosity and were influenced by information about others’ payments.



Citation:

Minah Jung, Leif Nelson, Ayelet Gneezy, and Uri Gneezy (2013) ,"People Pay More When They Pay-It-Forward", in E - European Advances in Consumer Research Volume 10, eds. Gert Cornelissen, Elena Reutskaja, and Ana Valenzuela, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 44-46.

Authors

Minah Jung, University of California Berkeley, USA
Leif Nelson, University of California Berkeley, USA
Ayelet Gneezy, University of California San Diego, USA
Uri Gneezy, University of California San Diego, USA



Volume

E - European Advances in Consumer Research Volume 10 | 2013



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