How Incidental Affect Alters Subsequent Judgments: Insights From Behavioral and Fmri Studies

Incidental affect prior to the consumption influences the evaluation of the consumed good, but the processes subserving this incidental reward effect is not well understood. We find that behavioral responses support “affect-as-information” theories, but the neural data find evidence for an “affect regulation” hypothesis.



Citation:

Hilke Plassmann, Beth Pavlicek , and Baba Shiv (2013) ,"How Incidental Affect Alters Subsequent Judgments: Insights From Behavioral and Fmri Studies", in E - European Advances in Consumer Research Volume 10, eds. Gert Cornelissen, Elena Reutskaja, and Ana Valenzuela, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 40-43.

Authors

Hilke Plassmann, INSEAD, France
Beth Pavlicek , INSEAD, France
Baba Shiv, Stanford University, USA



Volume

E - European Advances in Consumer Research Volume 10 | 2013



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