Favorites Fall Faster: Consequences of Initial Preferences

We investigate the role of initial stimulus "liking" on the rate of satiation. Intuitively, it might be assumed that stimuli "liked more" tend to be enjoyed longer and more consistently. However, we demonstrate that more liked stimuli may satiate at a much faster rate than much less liked stimuli.



Citation:

Alexander DePaoli and Uzma Khan (2013) ,"Favorites Fall Faster: Consequences of Initial Preferences", in E - European Advances in Consumer Research Volume 10, eds. Gert Cornelissen, Elena Reutskaja, and Ana Valenzuela, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 346-346.

Authors

Alexander DePaoli, Stanford University, USA
Uzma Khan, Stanford University, USA



Volume

E - European Advances in Consumer Research Volume 10 | 2013



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