Mix It Baby: the Effect of Customization on Perceived Healthiness

Three studies demonstrate that the mere act of selecting one’s own ingredients decreases its perceived healthiness. Also, we provide evidence for the underlying mechanism: the effect is pronounced for individuals that generally do not attach great importance to healthy nutrition but attenuated for individuals that care about healthy nutrition.



Citation:

Nina Gros, Anne Klesse, Valerie Meise, and Darren Dahl (2013) ,"Mix It Baby: the Effect of Customization on Perceived Healthiness ", in E - European Advances in Consumer Research Volume 10, eds. Gert Cornelissen, Elena Reutskaja, and Ana Valenzuela, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 31-34.

Authors

Nina Gros, Maastricht University, The Netherlands
Anne Klesse, Tilburg University, The Netherlands
Valerie Meise, Maastricht University, The Netherlands
Darren Dahl, University of British Columbia, Canada



Volume

E - European Advances in Consumer Research Volume 10 | 2013



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