Source Gender of Health Information: Does It Really Matter?

Using a factorial designed experiment, this study extended source gender (male, female) of information research by evaluating behavioural measures over time. Physical activity levels were the targeted behaviour. Analysis revealed that a male source was more influential for physical activity increases compared to a female source during the treatment phase.



Citation:

Sarah Forbes, Kirsten Robertson, and Rob Lawson (2013) ,"Source Gender of Health Information: Does It Really Matter?", in E - European Advances in Consumer Research Volume 10, eds. Gert Cornelissen, Elena Reutskaja, and Ana Valenzuela, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 104-110.

Authors

Sarah Forbes, University of Birmingham, United Kingdom
Kirsten Robertson, University of Otago, New Zealand
Rob Lawson, University of Otago, New Zealand



Volume

E - European Advances in Consumer Research Volume 10 | 2013



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