Subjective Expected Utility and Subjective Well-Being: Effect on Luxury Consumption in Transitional Economies

Transitional economies represent a substantial market potential. However, understanding of the “anomalies” of consumer behavior in those countries lacks specificity due to dynamic changes in economic, social and political environment. The paper applies a concept of subjective expected utility and analyzes consumer subjective well-being in BRICS.



Citation:

Gregory Kivenzor (2013) ,"Subjective Expected Utility and Subjective Well-Being: Effect on Luxury Consumption in Transitional Economies", in E - European Advances in Consumer Research Volume 10, eds. Gert Cornelissen, Elena Reutskaja, and Ana Valenzuela, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 345-345.

Authors

Gregory Kivenzor, Rivier University, USA



Volume

E - European Advances in Consumer Research Volume 10 | 2013



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