Redundant Information As a Choice Architecture Tool: How Attribute Decomposition on Displays Can Be Used to Highlight Important Dimensions For Consumers

In three experiments we provide evidence supporting the idea that redundant attributes on displays can shift psychological weight assigned to dimensions and alter preferences. Applying this principle in environmental decisions we show how redundant information can be utilized as a choice architecture tool to increase preference for more fuel-efficient cars.



Citation:

Christoph Ungemach, Adrian Camilleri, Eric Johnson, Rick Larrick, and Elke Weber (2012) ,"Redundant Information As a Choice Architecture Tool: How Attribute Decomposition on Displays Can Be Used to Highlight Important Dimensions For Consumers", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 40, eds. Zeynep Gürhan-Canli, Cele Otnes, and Rui (Juliet) Zhu, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 298-302.

Authors

Christoph Ungemach, Columbia University, USA
Adrian Camilleri, Duke University, USA
Eric Johnson, Columbia University, USA
Rick Larrick, Duke University, USA
Elke Weber, Columbia University, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 40 | 2012



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