When Soft Drink Taxes Don't Work: a Comparative Study

Many have pushed for a tax on full calorie soft drinks. Results from a controlled field experiment demonstrate no effect on fluid ounces of full calorie or diet soft drinks purchased. This suggests limited health outcomes from such policies.



Citation:

Andrew Hanks, Brian Wansink, and David Just (2012) ,"When Soft Drink Taxes Don't Work: a Comparative Study", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 40, eds. Zeynep Gürhan-Canli, Cele Otnes, and Rui (Juliet) Zhu, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 1049-1050.

Authors

Andrew Hanks, Cornell University, USA
Brian Wansink, Cornell University, USA
David Just, Cornell University, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 40 | 2012



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