Hmm…What Did Those Ads Say? Reducing the Continued Influence Effect in Political Comparison Advertisements

Comparative advertisements provide contradictory information and corrections. The impact this has on consumer’s decisions is unknown because it is difficult to know what will be recalled. The continued influence effect (CIE) occurs when original information prevails in memory although a correction is acknowledged. This paper aims to reduce the CIE.



Citation:

Rebecca E. Dingus, Robert D. Jewell, and Jennifer Wiggins Johnson (2012) ,"Hmm…What Did Those Ads Say? Reducing the Continued Influence Effect in Political Comparison Advertisements ", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 40, eds. Zeynep Gürhan-Canli, Cele Otnes, and Rui (Juliet) Zhu, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 1138-1138.

Authors

Rebecca E. Dingus, Kent State University, USA
Robert D. Jewell, Kent State University, USA
Jennifer Wiggins Johnson, Kent State University, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 40 | 2012



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