But How Did You Expect to Feel?: the Motivated Misremembering of Affective Forecasts

This research demonstrates that people routinely misremember their affective forecasts as being less favorable than both their actual forecast and their actual experience. We claim that people misremember their forecasts to make unsurprising experiences feel more surprising to them because they derive affective benefits from misremembering their forecasts this way.



Citation:

Mathew S. Isaac, Alexander Fedorikhin, and David Gal (2012) ,"But How Did You Expect to Feel?: the Motivated Misremembering of Affective Forecasts", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 40, eds. Zeynep Gürhan-Canli, Cele Otnes, and Rui (Juliet) Zhu, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 1037-1037.

Authors

Mathew S. Isaac, Seattle University, USA
Alexander Fedorikhin, Indiana University, USA
David Gal, Northwestern University, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 40 | 2012



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