Tipping the Scale: Discriminability Effects in Measurement

A ratio scale can be multiplied by an arbitrary factor (e.g., 10) while preserving all critical information. However, we demonstrate that 1) expanded (e.g. 100 vs. 10.0-point) scales increase the relative importance of attributes in conjoint, though they 2) do not increase participants’ explicit importance ratings, and 3) show diminishing sensitivity.



Citation:

Katherine Burson and Richard Larrick (2012) ,"Tipping the Scale: Discriminability Effects in Measurement", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 40, eds. Zeynep Gürhan-Canli, Cele Otnes, and Rui (Juliet) Zhu, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 280-283.

Authors

Katherine Burson, University of Michigan, USA
Richard Larrick, Duke University, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 40 | 2012



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