When More Leads to Less: Greater Attentional Bias For Emotional Information Is Negatively Associated With Self-Reported Feelings

We show that individuals who display greater attentional bias to emotional information—and hence experience emotional stimuli as more intense—report to be affected less by emotional stimuli on standard emotional rating scales. This negative correlation stems from an automatic reaction to emotional scale anchors.



Citation:

Daniel Fernandes, Bart de Langhe, and Stefano Puntoni (2012) ,"When More Leads to Less: Greater Attentional Bias For Emotional Information Is Negatively Associated With Self-Reported Feelings", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 40, eds. Zeynep Gürhan-Canli, Cele Otnes, and Rui (Juliet) Zhu, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 1043-1044.

Authors

Daniel Fernandes, Erasmus University Rotterdam, The Netherlands
Bart de Langhe, University of Colorado, USA
Stefano Puntoni, Erasmus University Rotterdam, The Netherlands



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 40 | 2012



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