The Effect of Dual Anchors on Numeric Judgments: the Moderating Effects of Anchor Order and Domain Knowledge

Experiment 1 tests dual anchors and finds a primacy effect among high-knowledge individuals but a recency effect among low-knowledge individuals. Experiment 2 shows that extreme anchors suppress primacy effects in high knowledge, ostensibly due to perceived implausibility, but exaggerate recency effects in low knowledge where implausibility is not as obvious.



Citation:

Devon DelVecchio and Timothy Heath (2012) ,"The Effect of Dual Anchors on Numeric Judgments: the Moderating Effects of Anchor Order and Domain Knowledge", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 40, eds. Zeynep Gürhan-Canli, Cele Otnes, and Rui (Juliet) Zhu, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 547-552.

Authors

Devon DelVecchio, Miami University, USA
Timothy Heath, HEC Paris, France



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 40 | 2012



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