A Coke Is a Coke? Interpreting Social Media Anti-Brand Rhetoric and Resolution

The study offers a rich non-Western context for theorizing about co-creation and the ideological role of social media for global brands. This paper is the result of a netnography of six social media communities in Turkey focusing on the Coca Cola brand. Our findings suggest that some local rituals integrate the brand with the traditions of the local culture. Each culture has its own way of dealing with such tensions by daily consumption experiences and rituals. Resolutions are not the province of those produce anti-Coke rhetoric, as Holt’s (2002) study of resistant brand activists suggests, but rather of the average consumer. Thus, this study offers insights on how local and global social media and online discussions co-create the meanings surrounding a brand. Global-local social media-based brand co-creation can be understood as an ideological element of consumption processes in people’s daily lives.



Citation:

E. Tacli Yazicioglu and Eser Borak (2012) ,"A Coke Is a Coke? Interpreting Social Media Anti-Brand Rhetoric and Resolution", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 40, eds. Zeynep Gürhan-Canli, Cele Otnes, and Rui (Juliet) Zhu, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 561-566.

Authors

E. Tacli Yazicioglu, Bogazici University, Turkey
Eser Borak, Bogazici University, Turkey



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 40 | 2012



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