Feeling Lucky While Feeling Good: the Relative Impacts of Superstitious Beliefs and Affect on Consumer Judgment and Choice

We examine the moderating role of superstitious beliefs on the established relationship between affect and preferences for a hedonic versus utilitarian product. Two studies show that luck primes are more important than affect in influencing preferences, and luck primes are less influential among consumers who have a high chronic belief-in-good-luck.



Citation:

Meredith David and Thomas Kramer (2012) ,"Feeling Lucky While Feeling Good: the Relative Impacts of Superstitious Beliefs and Affect on Consumer Judgment and Choice", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 40, eds. Zeynep Gürhan-Canli, Cele Otnes, and Rui (Juliet) Zhu, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 1119-1119.

Authors

Meredith David, University of South Carolina, USA
Thomas Kramer, University of South Carolina, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 40 | 2012



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