Seeing What You Smell: an Eye Tracking Analysis of Visual Attention

In three eye-tracking experiments we find that pleasant scents increase visual attention to ad elements only when they are semantically congruent with the items in the ad. Further, the effect is greater when the items in the ad are more sensorially concrete (vs. abstract).



Citation:

May Lwin, Maureen Morrin, Chiao Sing Chong, and Su Xia Tan (2012) ,"Seeing What You Smell: an Eye Tracking Analysis of Visual Attention ", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 40, eds. Zeynep Gürhan-Canli, Cele Otnes, and Rui (Juliet) Zhu, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 236-240.

Authors

May Lwin, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore
Maureen Morrin, Rutgers University, USA
Chiao Sing Chong, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore
Su Xia Tan, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 40 | 2012



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