When Controversy Begets Conversation

Analysis of 5,000 posts from an online discussion forum and two lab experiments reveal when and why controversy increases or decreases conversation. Controversial topics are more interesting to talk about, but also create discomfort, so the impact of controversy on conversation depends on how contextual factors shape these opposing mechanisms.



Citation:

Zoey Chen and Jonah Berger (2012) ,"When Controversy Begets Conversation", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 40, eds. Zeynep Gürhan-Canli, Cele Otnes, and Rui (Juliet) Zhu, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 228-231.

Authors

Zoey Chen, Georgia Tech, USA
Jonah Berger, University of Pennsylvania, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 40 | 2012



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