Who Spend More on Children’S Education: “I” Or “We”?

Three studies showed that interdependent self-construal induced more parental education spending than independent self-construal, and this effect was reversed when parent’s failure was primed. Further the moderating role of failure on self-construal effect was mediated by parental identity salience.



Citation:

Lingjiang Tu and Yinlong Zhang (2012) ,"Who Spend More on Children’S Education: “I” Or “We”?", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 40, eds. Zeynep Gürhan-Canli, Cele Otnes, and Rui (Juliet) Zhu, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 1111-1111.

Authors

Lingjiang Tu, University of Texas at San Antonio, USA
Yinlong Zhang, University of Texas at San Antonio, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 40 | 2012



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