Eat to Be Fit Or Fit to Eat? Restrained Eaters’ Food Consumption in Response to Fitness Cues

Consumption of food perceived as dietary-forbidden decreases if restrained (versus unrestrained) eaters are incidentally primed with fitness. Ironically, consumption of isocaloric food perceived as dietary-allowed increases for restrained eaters in response to incidental fitness primes or when fitness is integral to the product. Biases in self-perception can explain these effects.



Citation:

Joerg Koenigstorfer and Hans Baumgartner (2012) ,"Eat to Be Fit Or Fit to Eat? Restrained Eaters’ Food Consumption in Response to Fitness Cues", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 40, eds. Zeynep Gürhan-Canli, Cele Otnes, and Rui (Juliet) Zhu, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 954-955.

Authors

Joerg Koenigstorfer, Pennsylvania State University, USA
Hans Baumgartner, Pennsylvania State University, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 40 | 2012



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