Narratives in Cancer Prevention: a Review of a 10 Year Research Program

Participants viewed either a narrative or information format video regarding breast cancer. The narrative video was better liked, enhanced recall, reduced counter-arguing, reduced perceived fewer barriers to mammography, increased confidence that mammograms work, and increased perceptions of cancer as an important problem. Possible mechanisms for these effects are explored.



Citation:

Matthew Kreuter (2012) ,"Narratives in Cancer Prevention: a Review of a 10 Year Research Program", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 40, eds. Zeynep Gürhan-Canli, Cele Otnes, and Rui (Juliet) Zhu, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 191-194.

Authors

Matthew Kreuter, Washington University, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 40 | 2012



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