The Effect of Message Credibility, Need For Cognitive Closure, and Information Sufficiency on Thought-Induced Attitude Change

This research provides important new insight into self-generated persuasion. Source effects can result in polarizing effects if the source is credible but depolarizing effects if the source is less credible. Further, thought-induced attitude change depends on varying levels of Need for Cognitive Closure and information sufficiency.



Citation:

Bruce E. Pfeiffer, Hélène Deval, David H. Silvera, Maria L. Cronley, and Frank R. Kardes (2012) ,"The Effect of Message Credibility, Need For Cognitive Closure, and Information Sufficiency on Thought-Induced Attitude Change", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 40, eds. Zeynep Gürhan-Canli, Cele Otnes, and Rui (Juliet) Zhu, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 933-934.

Authors

Bruce E. Pfeiffer, University of New Hampshire, USA
Hélène Deval, Dalhousie University, Canada
David H. Silvera, University of Texas at San Antonio, USA
Maria L. Cronley, Miami University, USA
Frank R. Kardes, University of Cincinnati, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 40 | 2012



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