Effective Substitution: the Drawback of High Similarity

Little is known about what determines the effectiveness of one product’s ability to substitute for another. We show that although consumers believe that highly similar products are better substitutes, in fact moderately similar products prompt an abstract view of the goal, making them more effective substitutes.



Citation:

Zachary Arens and Rebecca Hamilton (2012) ,"Effective Substitution: the Drawback of High Similarity", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 40, eds. Zeynep Gürhan-Canli, Cele Otnes, and Rui (Juliet) Zhu, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 931-932.

Authors

Zachary Arens, University of Maryland, USA
Rebecca Hamilton, University of Maryland, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 40 | 2012



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