Remembering Better Or Remembering Worse: Age Effects on False Memory

While researchers have focused on understanding the origins, characteristics and consequences of false memories, there has been little focus on variables that moderate false memories. In this paper, we examine one such variable – age and find that false memories are more pronounced for younger adults as compared to older adults.



Citation:

Priyali Rajagopal and Nicole Montgomery (2012) ,"Remembering Better Or Remembering Worse: Age Effects on False Memory", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 40, eds. Zeynep Gürhan-Canli, Cele Otnes, and Rui (Juliet) Zhu, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 928-928.

Authors

Priyali Rajagopal, Southern Methodist University, USA
Nicole Montgomery, College of William & Mary, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 40 | 2012



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