Mortality Threat Can Increase Or Decrease Women’S Caloric Intake Depending on Their Childhood Environment

How do mortality stressors influence women’s eating? Drawing on an evolutionary perspective, we propose that mortality stressors should have different effects depending on a woman’s childhood environment. Three experiments show that whereas mortality increased eating for women who grew up poor, it decreased eating for women who grew up wealthy.



Citation:

Sarah Hill, Christopher Rodeheffer , Danielle DelPriore , and Max Butterfield (2012) ,"Mortality Threat Can Increase Or Decrease Women’S Caloric Intake Depending on Their Childhood Environment", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 40, eds. Zeynep Gürhan-Canli, Cele Otnes, and Rui (Juliet) Zhu, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 163-167.

Authors

Sarah Hill, Texas Christian University, USA
Christopher Rodeheffer , Texas Christian University, USA
Danielle DelPriore , Texas Christian University, USA
Max Butterfield , Texas Christian University, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 40 | 2012



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