In Control of Variety: How Self-Control Reduces the Effect of Food Variety

The presence of variety has been shown to increase food consumption, but a recent meta-analysis concludes that person factors do not influence this variety effect. The current work identifies trait self-control as an important person factor that moderates the variety effect for food, which may facilitate positive health outcomes.



Citation:

Kelly Haws and Joseph Redden (2012) ,"In Control of Variety: How Self-Control Reduces the Effect of Food Variety ", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 40, eds. Zeynep Gürhan-Canli, Cele Otnes, and Rui (Juliet) Zhu, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 163-167.

Authors

Kelly Haws, Texas A&M University, USA
Joseph Redden, University of Minnesota, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 40 | 2012



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