You Might Not Get What You Ask For: Evidence For and Impact of Non-Wtp Reporting in Willingness-To-Pay Surveys

Price-generation tasks are widely used to measure consumers’ willingness-to-pay (WTP). Despite their simplicity and flexibility, we find that consumers often face difficulties to correctly perform such tasks. Specifically, consumers’ who lack ability and motivation are likely to engage in satisficing behavior, which has negative effects on external validity of measures.



Citation:

Reto Hofstetter, David Blatter, and Klaus Miller (2012) ,"You Might Not Get What You Ask For: Evidence For and Impact of Non-Wtp Reporting in Willingness-To-Pay Surveys", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 40, eds. Zeynep Gürhan-Canli, Cele Otnes, and Rui (Juliet) Zhu, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 887-888.

Authors

Reto Hofstetter, University of St. Gallen, Switzerland
David Blatter, University of Bern, Switzerland
Klaus Miller, University of Bern, Switzerland



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 40 | 2012



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