Ironic Effects of Food Commercials: When More Food-Related Mental Images Make You Eat Less

Food advertisements allowing imagining high-caloric foods consumption may increase feelings of fatness, characterizing the thought-shape fusion (TSF) phenomenon. Study 1 shows that a food advertisement inducing TSF increases food restriction intentions. Study 2 explores the TSF mechanism and shows that a high imagery-evoking food advertisement reduces subsequent food consumption.



Citation:

Carolina O.C. Werle, Mia Birau, and Jennifer Coelho (2012) ,"Ironic Effects of Food Commercials: When More Food-Related Mental Images Make You Eat Less", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 40, eds. Zeynep Gürhan-Canli, Cele Otnes, and Rui (Juliet) Zhu, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 1108-1108.

Authors

Carolina O.C. Werle, Grenoble Ecole de Management, France
Mia Birau, Grenoble Ecole de Management, France
Jennifer Coelho, University of Savoie, France



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 40 | 2012



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