Self-Control Spillover: Impulse Inhibition Facilitates Simultaneous Self-Control in Unrelated Domains

Recent neuropsychological work suggests that inhibiting impulses in one domain can facilitate the simultaneous inhibition of other impulses. In five experiments, using a variety of self-control tasks known to require inhibition (e.g., emotion regulation) we show their beneficial impact on simultaneous but unrelated self-control tasks (e.g., unhealthy food consumption).



Citation:

Mirjam Tuk, Kuangjie Zhang, and Steven Sweldens (2012) ,"Self-Control Spillover: Impulse Inhibition Facilitates Simultaneous Self-Control in Unrelated Domains", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 40, eds. Zeynep Gürhan-Canli, Cele Otnes, and Rui (Juliet) Zhu, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 858-859.

Authors

Mirjam Tuk, Imperial College Business School, UK and INSEAD, France
Kuangjie Zhang, INSEAD, Singapore
Steven Sweldens, INSEAD, France



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 40 | 2012



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