Self-Affirmation Can Backfire For Experts: the Case of Product Warning Messages

Self-affirmation leads to higher acceptance of information consumers would otherwise perceive as threatening. However, we demonstrate that, as expertise increases, self-affirmation leads instead to reactance to the threat. More specifically, self-affirmation for more expert consumers evaluating products containing warning messages leads to more positive product perceptions, that is, self-affirmation backfires.



Citation:

Valeria Noguti (2012) ,"Self-Affirmation Can Backfire For Experts: the Case of Product Warning Messages", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 40, eds. Zeynep Gürhan-Canli, Cele Otnes, and Rui (Juliet) Zhu, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 839-840.

Authors

Valeria Noguti, University of Technology Sydney, Australia



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 40 | 2012



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