To Think Or Not to Think: the Pros and Cons of Thought Suppression

We investigate why suppressing thoughts about a failure results in poor consumption decisions. Although both mechanisms required for thought suppression have been shown to affect consumption, we demonstrate that it is finding distracting thoughts, not the monitoring process, which depletes self-regulatory resources. This means the depleting effect can be managed.



Citation:

Natalina Zlatevska and Elizabeth Cowley (2012) ,"To Think Or Not to Think: the Pros and Cons of Thought Suppression", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 40, eds. Zeynep Gürhan-Canli, Cele Otnes, and Rui (Juliet) Zhu, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 837-838.

Authors

Natalina Zlatevska, Bond University, Australia
Elizabeth Cowley, University of Sydney, Australia



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 40 | 2012



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