Looking For Answers in the Forest Rather Than the Trees: Causal Uncertainty Increases Attraction to Abstraction

Not knowing the reason behind an event activates a need for abstraction and leads to greater preference for abstract (vs. concrete) photographs and advertising message; this need was attenuated after a broad (vs. narrow) categorization task. What people are really seeking through abstraction is the essence (similar pattern) across problems.



Citation:

Jae-Eun Namkoong and Marlone Henderson (2012) ,"Looking For Answers in the Forest Rather Than the Trees: Causal Uncertainty Increases Attraction to Abstraction", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 40, eds. Zeynep Gürhan-Canli, Cele Otnes, and Rui (Juliet) Zhu, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 825-825.

Authors

Jae-Eun Namkoong, University of Texas at Austin, USA
Marlone Henderson, University of Texas at Austin, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 40 | 2012



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