Phonetic Symbolism and Children’S Brand Name and Brand Logo Preference

Phonemes can provide a cue for brand attributes with consumers preferring congruency between a brand’s name-logo and attributes. Since children don’t have adult-level language skills, they may not attach similar meaning to phonemes. In three experiments, we examine the meanings children draw from phonemes and its implications for branding.



Citation:

Stacey Baxter, Tina Lowrey, and Min Liu (2012) ,"Phonetic Symbolism and Children’S Brand Name and Brand Logo Preference", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 40, eds. Zeynep Gürhan-Canli, Cele Otnes, and Rui (Juliet) Zhu, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 1133-1133.

Authors

Stacey Baxter, University of Newcastle, Australia
Tina Lowrey, University of Texas at San Antonio, USA
Min Liu, University of Texas at San Antonio, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 40 | 2012



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