Understanding Sub-Cultural Identity and Consumption Among Indians in the United States: From Desis to Coconuts

This qualitative study illustrates how the dynamics of consumption are used to control, create and communicate diasporic sub-cultural identities. Fanon’s theory of internalization is employed as a means to understand how and why Indian immigrant identities are in flux. Findings suggest that these identities are best interpreted through a continuum.



Citation:

Minita Sanghvi and Nancy Hodges (2012) ,"Understanding Sub-Cultural Identity and Consumption Among Indians in the United States: From Desis to Coconuts", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 40, eds. Zeynep Gürhan-Canli, Cele Otnes, and Rui (Juliet) Zhu, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 462-468.

Authors

Minita Sanghvi, University of North Carolina Greensboro, USA
Nancy Hodges, University of North Carolina Greensboro, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 40 | 2012



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