Deception in Marketing: How the Source Influences Consumer’S Responses to Deception and Its Contagious Effect on Unrelated Immoral Behavior

This study shows that perceptions of deceptive marketing strategies can be influenced by situational factors, like the source of the deception. Moreover, deception can be contagious to other (im)moral behavior, both related to the source, as well as unrelated to a consumer context.



Citation:

Marijke Leliveld and Laetitia Mulder (2012) ,"Deception in Marketing: How the Source Influences Consumer’S Responses to Deception and Its Contagious Effect on Unrelated Immoral Behavior", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 40, eds. Zeynep Gürhan-Canli, Cele Otnes, and Rui (Juliet) Zhu, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 1139-1139.

Authors

Marijke Leliveld, University of Groningen, The Netherlands
Laetitia Mulder, University of Groningen, The Netherlands



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 40 | 2012



Share Proceeding

Featured papers

See More

Featured

A5. Trusting the Tweeting President: Inside the Donald's reality: Gaslighting, pschometrics and social media

Dianne Dean, University of Hull
Fiona Walkley, Hull University Business School
Robin Croft, Brunel University

Read More

Featured

Mediation as a Multi-Dimensional Process of Brand-Related Interaction

Serena Wider, Copenhagen Business School
Andrea Lucarelli, Lund University
Sylvia Wallpach, Copenhagen Business School

Read More

Featured

How Well Do Consumer-Brand Relationships Drive Customer Brand Loyalty? Generalizations from a Meta-Analysis of Brand Relationship Elasticities

Mansur Khamitov, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore
Xin (Shane) Wang, Western University, Canada
Matthew Thomson, Western University, Canada

Read More

Engage with Us

Becoming an Association for Consumer Research member is simple. Membership in ACR is relatively inexpensive, but brings significant benefits to its members.