Reminders of Money Focus People on What’S Functional

The results of three experiments show that reminders of money make people behave more functionally. Furthermore, this functionality results in individuals behaving more prosocially (i.e., choosing to save people, wanting to socialize, and being better at socializing)—when it serves a utilitarian benefit.



Citation:

Kathleen D. Vohs, Cassie Mogilner, George Newman, and Jennifer Aaker (2012) ,"Reminders of Money Focus People on What’S Functional", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 40, eds. Zeynep Gürhan-Canli, Cele Otnes, and Rui (Juliet) Zhu, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 121-124.

Authors

Kathleen D. Vohs, University of Minnesota, USA
Cassie Mogilner, University of Pennsylvania, USA
George Newman, Yale University, USA
Jennifer Aaker, Stanford University, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 40 | 2012



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