What’S the Point of Temptation If You Don’T Give in to It? the Positive Impact of Vice Consumption on Consumer Vitality

Drawing on self-determination theory, this research proposes that vice consumption – for example, eating a tempting snack – enhances vitality, and consequently, creativity and self-control. The vitalizing effect of vice (vs. virtue) consumption is greater when such behavior can be justified – e.g., on the grounds that it was externally-imposed rather than self-chosen.



Citation:

Fangyuan Chen and Jaideep Sengupta (2012) ,"What’S the Point of Temptation If You Don’T Give in to It? the Positive Impact of Vice Consumption on Consumer Vitality", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 40, eds. Zeynep Gürhan-Canli, Cele Otnes, and Rui (Juliet) Zhu, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 90-94.

Authors

Fangyuan Chen, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, China
Jaideep Sengupta, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, China



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 40 | 2012



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