Mental Thermoregulation: Affective and Cognitive Pathways For Non-Physical Temperature Regulation

We examine the effect of experienced physical temperature on an individual’s decision-making process. We suggest that reliance on emotions can function as a psychologically-warming process while reliance on cognitions can function as a psychologically-cooling process, and thus individuals may alter their decision-making style according to their thermoregulatory objectives.



Citation:

Rhonda Hadi, Lauren Block, and Dan King (2012) ,"Mental Thermoregulation: Affective and Cognitive Pathways For Non-Physical Temperature Regulation", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 40, eds. Zeynep Gürhan-Canli, Cele Otnes, and Rui (Juliet) Zhu, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 42-47.

Authors

Rhonda Hadi, Baruch College, USA
Lauren Block, Baruch College, USA
Dan King, National University of Singapore Business School, Singapore



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 40 | 2012



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