Matching Choices to Minimize Offense: Avoiding Offending Stigmatized Group Members By Making Similar Choices For Them and For Us

We find that when people choose food for themselves and for a dining companion, their choices are affected by their companion’s weight. When the companion is overweight, people are more likely to “match” (to choose identical food for self and other), apparently to avoid offending the overweight companion.



Citation:

Peggy J. Liu, Troy H. Campbell, Gavan J. Fitzsimons, and Grainne M. Fitzsimons (2012) ,"Matching Choices to Minimize Offense: Avoiding Offending Stigmatized Group Members By Making Similar Choices For Them and For Us", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 40, eds. Zeynep Gürhan-Canli, Cele Otnes, and Rui (Juliet) Zhu, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 37-41.

Authors

Peggy J. Liu, Duke University, USA
Troy H. Campbell, Duke University, USA
Gavan J. Fitzsimons, Duke University, USA
Grainne M. Fitzsimons, Duke University, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 40 | 2012



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