The (Ironic) Dove Effect: How Normalizing Overweight Body Types Increases Unhealthy Food Consumption and Lowers Motivation to Engage in Healthy Behaviors

The current research examined how the normalization of overweight body types can influence food consumption and health choices. In two studies, we found that “normalizing” the overweight resulted in greater consumption of an unhealthy food item, creation of meals containing more calories, and decreased motivation to be in better shape.



Citation:

Lily Lin and Brent McFerran (2012) ,"The (Ironic) Dove Effect: How Normalizing Overweight Body Types Increases Unhealthy Food Consumption and Lowers Motivation to Engage in Healthy Behaviors", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 40, eds. Zeynep Gürhan-Canli, Cele Otnes, and Rui (Juliet) Zhu, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 37-41.

Authors

Lily Lin, University of British Columbia, Canada
Brent McFerran, University of Michigan, USA



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 40 | 2012



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