Powerlessness-Induced Compensatory Consumption: the Preference For Experiential Vs. Material Luxury Products

Luxury products can either take the form of experiences (e.g., a vacation) or objects (e.g., a status car). Two experiments demonstrate that powerlessness leads to a higher willingness to pay for experiential status products over material status products, suggesting the former have a greater compensatory value than the latter.



Citation:

Ayalla Ruvio and David Dubois (2012) ,"Powerlessness-Induced Compensatory Consumption: the Preference For Experiential Vs. Material Luxury Products", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 40, eds. Zeynep Gürhan-Canli, Cele Otnes, and Rui (Juliet) Zhu, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 691-692.

Authors

Ayalla Ruvio, Temple University, USA
David Dubois, INSEAD, France



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 40 | 2012



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