(Illusory) Distance of Exposure As a Moderator of the Mere Exposure Effect

Two studies demonstrate that (illusory) distance of exposure moderates the mere exposure effect, such that distant rather than nearby stimuli are more likely to generate liking after initial exposure. This advantage for distant stimuli levels off after multiple exposures; both distant and nearby stimuli then generate liking.



Citation:

Anneleen Van Kerckhove and Maggie Geuens (2012) ,"(Illusory) Distance of Exposure As a Moderator of the Mere Exposure Effect", in NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 40, eds. Zeynep Gürhan-Canli, Cele Otnes, and Rui (Juliet) Zhu, Duluth, MN : Association for Consumer Research, Pages: 1137-1137.

Authors

Anneleen Van Kerckhove, Ghent University, Belgium
Maggie Geuens, Ghent University, Belgium



Volume

NA - Advances in Consumer Research Volume 40 | 2012



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